Monthly Archives: November 2015

Working from Home

In the excitement of taking everything off the deck that could be removed, I’ve also removed both locker lids, both fore and saloon hatches (more on the hatches later), main hatch garage and the anchor locker lid. We had enough stuff in our garage, now there’s even more! During a retail therapy session in Plymouth (Yes, Plymouth!), I’ve acquire a belt sander and used this to remove the old paint and non-slip gelcoat from the anchor locker and hatch garage at home. Unfortunately, I’ve taken too much off in places. (I claim that the gelcoat was a bit thin in places and too thick in others!) It is also clear that there are lots of pinholes in the gelcoat so it will be essential to put extra layers of epoxy paint onto the garage. I’m also thinking of putting some extra fibreglass on the inside to stiffen it up. The next job at home is to start filling the holes and scratches and places where the gel is missing on the hatches. We have found both cockpit hatch lids are concave, one is about 8mm deep so if we put the synthetic teak on, there will be a pool of water in the middle! I’ve been advised that I can build up the middle with polyester resin (thickened) then fill and fair to make it flat with my new toy.

The belt sander was put to good use over this weekend and I’ve removed about 95% of all the old rotton paint from the coachroof, cockpit sole (floor) and side decks and very dusty it was too; the Henry vacumn cleaner was full after 20 mins, the bagless one was full after 2 mins, so I used the good dust masks instead and swept all the dust up. It is a case of 80-20; doing 80% of the work takes 20% of the effort and vice versa for the final 20%! As well as the law of diminishing returns! I’ll stop when I run out of ideas or get really bored with sanding.

The weather has really gone downhill now so I don’t suppose that we will have the right conditions until spring;  the paint needs 15ºC and 75% relative humidity, fat chance at the moment. There’s plenty to keep me quiet: teak panels to make, cockpit lids to level up, glasses lockers to make, drawer unit to design and install etc!

 

Now It’s Getting DUSTY!

Everything that can be removed from the decks and coachroof has been removed except for the stanchions and guardrails so that we are less likely to fall off the boat! We are two and a bit metres off the ground and some of it is concrete!

The weather has changed for the worse so that it gets quite dark inside our shed, so I’ve rigged up a light to help see; it’s made a huge difference. I’ve also got a flood light ready but have not used it yet. Watch this space.

The Shed now has PROPER lighting!

The Shed now has PROPER lighting!

All the gunk/stuff that held the ply in the cockpit has been removed:

Cockpit seat with the ply removed

Cockpit seat with the ply removed

To look like this:

Cockpit part way through the renovation

Cockpit part way through the renovation

It did look like this:

Cockpit before anything was started

Cockpit before anything was started

I’ve been using an orbital sander to get all the old muck and pint off; the paint had been applied to unsanded gelcoat, applied over blemishes, dirt and clearly had no care. Unfortunately, an orbital sander is not enough to strip off the old gelcoat non-slip surface, so I’m buying a belt sander this week.

Chainplates and Cockpit

The Boss and Skipper were on the boat this weekend facing our separate challenges of getting stuff off the deck. The Boss decided that swinging a hammer to strip off the “teak” ply off the cockpit seat was her thing, whilst the Skipper continued with the removal of the chainplates.

The Boss with Two Weapons!

The Boss with Two Weapons!

To start off, the Boss put the Skipper inside the aft locker and we managed to remove the final cleat. The next two-handed job was undoing the bolts holding the chainplates, one person in the saloon, the other in the locker or, on the port-side, the heads. Some of the nuts were buried inside the double skin and, we hope, still fixed in the resin when the boat was built.

Access to Underside of Chainplate via a Rough Old Hole

Access to Underside of Chainplate via a Rough Old Hole

We’re discovering that the boat-builders did not finish the detail very well. Each chainplate is fixed to the deck with 4 bolts and the aft pair have backing washers and nuts for every bolt. However, access to the forward chainplate nuts is by drilling out the holes in the bulkhead, (behind the discoloured gelcoat to the left of the metalwork) even then some of the bolts are just stuck into resin without a backing nut.

IMG_0770

Aft Chainplate, Cover cut away to access securing bolts

We now have another winter job which will be to drill out access to all 4 bolts and clean the space out to insert nuts for each bolt, then to clean up the rough holes that have been dug! Eventually, we got all 4 chainplates off and discovered that they had all leaked as is evident from the black staining under the plate.

Both Chainplates Removed

Both Chainplates Removed

We are well organised (I hope), we labelled everything that we have removed! The next day, the Skipper attacked the cockpit and removed the rest of the ply from the seats, however, I think that I have forgotten the thin piece behind the locker lid (just visible)!

Cockpit Seat Removal - Work in Porgress

Cockpit Seat Removal – Work in Porgress

The bent chisel, made from an old tyre lever, worked very well. The hammer may be old, but it is well balanced and did the job well! Next challenge is to remove all the old glue by scraping it off and finally cleaning with a solvent but I’m not sure what will work. Watch this space! We still have to remove one more deck fitting – the fresh water inlet, but we need a heat gun to soften the tube to remove it from the fitting. This required the removal of the chart table locker (again).